“The 2002 ABS National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey found that one-quarter of Australia’s Indigenous population (aged 15 years and older) had been victims of physical or threatened violence in the twelve months preceding the survey. This was double the corresponding victimisation rate for non-Indigenous Australians and double the rate reported for Indigenous Australians back in 1994.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“In 1988, the (crude) Indigenous imprisonment rate stood at 1233.9 per 100,000 people. By 2012, the rate had risen to 2273.4 per 100,000 people, an increase of 84 per cent.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“[In the Mornington Island community] The proportion of Indigenous income spent on alcohol… reached 47 percent by 1987.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“By the time they reached the age of 23, more than three quarters of the New South Wales Indigenous population had been cautioned by police, referred to a youth justice conference or convicted of an offence in a New South Wales criminal court.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“The rate of Indigenous imprisonment is nearly eighteen times that of non-Indigenous Australians — six times larger than the disparity between African-American and white imprisonment rates in the United States.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
Almost one third of Black Americans live in neighbourhoods with a heavy concentration of poverty. Only one percent of Whites live in similar situations.
Ta-Nehisi Coates’s graph of the year

Almost one third of Black Americans live in neighbourhoods with a heavy concentration of poverty. Only one percent of Whites live in similar situations.

Ta-Nehisi Coates’s graph of the year

By age 18, the in-sample cumulative arrest prevalence rate lies between 15.9% and 26.8%; at age 23, it lies between 25.3% and 41.4%.

At least a quarter of Americans have been arrested by the time they are 23.

Cumulative Prevalence of Arrest From Ages 8 to 23 in a National Sample

“Those excluded will be stranded without insurance, stuck between people with slightly higher incomes who will qualify for federal subsidies on the new health exchanges that went live this week, and those who are poor enough to qualify for Medicaid in its current form, which has income ceilings as low as $11 a day in some states.”

in some states, making $12 a day is enough to disqualify you from medicaid. in some states, making $12 a day is enough to disqualify you from medicaid. in some states, making $12 a day is enough to disqualify you from medicaid. 

Millions of Poor Are Left Uncovered by Health Law - NYTimes.com

(via sorryeveryone)

The United States now spends some $200 billion on the correctional system each year, a sum that exceeds the gross domestic product of twenty-five US states and 140 foreign countries.

Raise the crime rate

Between 1984 and 1994, the death rate for young black males reached 1 percent—double the rate of soldiers fighting in Iraq.

Raise the crime rate

For 2008, for example, the government had previously tallied 935 confirmed instances of sexual abuse [in prison]. After asking around, and performing some calculations, the Justice Department came up with a new number: 216,000. That’s 216,000 victims, not instances. These victims are often assaulted multiple times over the course of the year. The Justice Department now seems to be saying that prison rape accounted for the majority of all rapes committed in the US in 2008.

Raise the crime rate

From 1980 to 2007, the number of prisoners held in the United States quadrupled to 2.3 million, with an additional 5 million on probation or parole.

Raise the crime rate


The black unemployment rate has consistently been twice as high as the white unemployment rate for 50 years

These ten charts show the black-white economic gap hasn’t budged in 50 years (more charts at the link)

The black unemployment rate has consistently been twice as high as the white unemployment rate for 50 years

These ten charts show the black-white economic gap hasn’t budged in 50 years (more charts at the link)