83% of people in tech jobs at Google are men and about 94% are White or Asian. In senior management positions, 79% are men and about 95% are White or Asian.
Google Diversity

83% of people in tech jobs at Google are men and about 94% are White or Asian. In senior management positions, 79% are men and about 95% are White or Asian.

Google Diversity

Who gets to graduate?
By their fourteenth birthday, African American children whose fathers do not have a high school diploma are more likely than not to see their fathers incarcerated.
Ten economic facts about crime and incarceration in the United States
By their fourteenth birthday, African American children whose fathers do not have a high school diploma are more likely than not to see their fathers incarcerated.

Ten economic facts about crime and incarceration in the United States


In 2012, the incarceration rate in the United States—which includes inmates in the custody of local jails, state or federal prisons, and privately operated facilities—was 710 per 100,000 U.S. residents (Glaze and Herberman 2013). This puts the U.S. incarceration rate at more than five times the typical global rate of 130, and more than twice the incarceration rate of 90 percent of the world’s countries (Walmsley 2013).

Ten economic facts about crime and incarceration in the United States

In 2012, the incarceration rate in the United States—which includes inmates in the custody of local jails, state or federal prisons, and privately operated facilities—was 710 per 100,000 U.S. residents (Glaze and Herberman 2013). This puts the U.S. incarceration rate at more than five times the typical global rate of 130, and more than twice the incarceration rate of 90 percent of the world’s countries (Walmsley 2013).

Ten economic facts about crime and incarceration in the United States


In 2008, the latest year for which data are available, the victimization rate for all personal crimes among individuals with family incomes of less than $15,000 was over three times the rate of those with family incomes of $75,000 or more.

Ten economic facts about crime and incarceration in the United States

In 2008, the latest year for which data are available, the victimization rate for all personal crimes among individuals with family incomes of less than $15,000 was over three times the rate of those with family incomes of $75,000 or more.

Ten economic facts about crime and incarceration in the United States

Atkinson, A. & Morelli, S. (2014). Chartbook of economic inequality.

Atkinson, A. & Morelli, S. (2014). Chartbook of economic inequality.

“The 2002 ABS National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey found that one-quarter of Australia’s Indigenous population (aged 15 years and older) had been victims of physical or threatened violence in the twelve months preceding the survey. This was double the corresponding victimisation rate for non-Indigenous Australians and double the rate reported for Indigenous Australians back in 1994.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“In 1988, the (crude) Indigenous imprisonment rate stood at 1233.9 per 100,000 people. By 2012, the rate had risen to 2273.4 per 100,000 people, an increase of 84 per cent.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“[In the Mornington Island community] The proportion of Indigenous income spent on alcohol… reached 47 percent by 1987.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“By the time they reached the age of 23, more than three quarters of the New South Wales Indigenous population had been cautioned by police, referred to a youth justice conference or convicted of an offence in a New South Wales criminal court.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
“The rate of Indigenous imprisonment is nearly eighteen times that of non-Indigenous Australians — six times larger than the disparity between African-American and white imprisonment rates in the United States.”
Weatherburn, D. (2014). Arresting incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment.
Almost one third of Black Americans live in neighbourhoods with a heavy concentration of poverty. Only one percent of Whites live in similar situations.
Ta-Nehisi Coates’s graph of the year

Almost one third of Black Americans live in neighbourhoods with a heavy concentration of poverty. Only one percent of Whites live in similar situations.

Ta-Nehisi Coates’s graph of the year

By age 18, the in-sample cumulative arrest prevalence rate lies between 15.9% and 26.8%; at age 23, it lies between 25.3% and 41.4%.

At least a quarter of Americans have been arrested by the time they are 23.

Cumulative Prevalence of Arrest From Ages 8 to 23 in a National Sample